Cryptography with DNA binary strands

Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. DNA binary strands can be used for steganography to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages.

I thought this as an interesting article since my last post was about DNA based security

http://www.cs.mun.ca/~banzhaf/molcomp.html

AUTHORS: Andre Leier, Christoph Richter, Wolfgang Banzhaf and Hilmar Rauhe

SOURCE: BioSystems, 57 (2000) 13 – 22,Extended Manuscript from 6th DIMACS Workshop on DNA Computing, Leiden, 2000

AUTHORS: Andre Leier, Christoph Richter, Wolfgang Banzhaf and Hilmar Rauhe

Record songs onto a Bacteria- yes Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory can claim to use bacteria as an ipod storage device

Researchers Store children’s song It’s a Small World on bacteria and recovered it from the 100th Generation

Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory used artificial DNA sequences to encode portions of the text of the children’s song It’s a Small World, added the sequences to bacteria DNA, allowed the bacteria to multiply, then extracted the message part of a DNA strand and retrieved the encoded information, Bliss ha just the kind of solution I need to store all my digital music when my ipod gets full.

Well may be not so easy since there are some potential problems the memory capacity would be huge because each bacteria in a colony could encode different information; it is very difficult to select a single bacteria from a colony, well that cant good, But I like the concept pretty futuristic

These DNA messages, each about 150 bases long, were inserted into bacteria such as E. coliDeinococcus radiodurans. Because DNA is passed down through generations of living organisms, information stored this way should survive for as long as the line of organisms survives, said Pak Wong, a chief scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. DNA is made up of four bases attached to a sugar-phosphate backbone. Different sequences of the four bases can represent digital information

Considering that a milliliter of liquid can contain up to 10 billion bacteria, the potential capacity of bacterial-based DNA memory is enormous

The researchers let the bacteria propagate for 100 generations, then retrieved the encoded information by extracting the message part of the DNA strand from the youngest generation and reading it via polymerase chain reaction, a laboratory procedure that took about two hours and involved a series of heating and cooling cycles.

The researchers used seven different bacteria to store and retrieve seven DNA fragments that ranged from 57 to 99 base pairs long and encoded text from the children’s song

The study was published in 2003

Server Virtualization

Citrix Acquire XenSource to Enter Server and Desktop Virtualization Markets. So whats it has got to do with genetics and bioinformatics , XenSource is the leading provider of enterprise-class virtual infrastructure solutions Originally created by the founders of XenSource at University of Cambridge, the Xen virtualization “engine” is now developed collaboratively by an active open source community.

Scientists were using a 16-node cluster for bioinformatics especially in case of smithman waterman balast, with each node containing a single-core processor. Three years ago, dual-processor nodes became common, so that same scientist needed an 8-node cluster. And then when dual-core became standard, a 4-nodes cluster could take over. With virtualization you can blow it up to many more nodes with no need for any expensive hardware.

Google Health -health information storage

interestingly I found this image from an earlier post of Bertalan at scienceroll

The story according to the blog Google Blogoscoped, Google’s nascent Google Health product, codenamed “Weaver”, will offer consumers the opportunity to create a central repository for their health records, including medications, history, test results and allergies. The blog has a number of screenshots of the program in development.

Well google certainly has more up its sleeve, doubt it, chek the google labs page,

Passionate about these topics? You should work at Google. among others listed is interest in genetic algorithms

living neurons for building a simple biological computer

Biological/organic computing has long been the stuffs of science fiction. But as we have all come to see, what is science fiction one day, does become science fact the next.

The scientific journal Physical Review E has just published a paper that highlights some of the new possibilities of using neurons for biological computing.

It may not sound like much, but it is the first step. We won’t have living computers anytime soon as more complex functions must be taught to neurons and cells to even begin to perform the most basic of fencings

DNA computer

We may have heard about it before and must have had a million ideas about hows its going to work out. Most of us also blogged about it to Hsiens recent post on biocomputers and my earlier posts about DNA computer for Diagnostics  and Digital data storing on bacteria were on the subject of scientists are looking at nature and adapting those ideals in technology

from NASA website

USC computer science professor Dr. Leonard Adleman, who made headlines in 1994 by demonstrating that DNA — the spiraling molecule that holds life’s genetic code — could be used to carry out computations.

now Physicist Graemme Brown of GBR Research has developed a computer chip made from DNA molecules – the building blocks of life – that can store and execute computer programmes.

The DNA tablet can be swallowed or inserted into the body and used to track down genetic defects and some illnesses. Massey University professors from Albany have been able to recreate the process in the lab and verify the findings.

Related posts

National Geographic , Wikipedia  biocomputers  , DNA computer for Diagnostics ,

Digital data storing on bacteriabiocomputers , NASA

Origami, Art, illustrations, Paintings- Art in science-Yup studying genetics is fun

I have written about the company DNA11 who makes graphic arts and illustration from your DNA fingerprinting. As more reseacrh papers are getting published in genetics fields there will be more useful commerical products in the market for healthcare and clinical application

But its good to see if some of these ventures can catch and attract the interest of youngsters especially at a stage when US and European governmnets lament about the lack of interests among students to opt for science subjects and research

here is a lists of few such stratups that offer DNA art and promises to put some fun in DNA research and my favourite among them DNA ARt.

DNA Art

web2DNA convert your website to DNA art

DNA origami Ker Than has written a blog on DNA origami . Dont writ it off as just fun the caltech researchers plans to use the technology to build faster computers. Paul Rothemund talkes about a method of creating nanoscale shapes and patterns using DNA termed as scaffolded DNA origami” so you can make nano copies of smilies or the world using DNA

DNA Artistry offers a similar service to DNA11 offering portratis and personalizeda rt with your DNA

DNA portrait offers DNA portrait art collage

Genome Quilt encoding genetic information in quilt designs

DNA Art

Microarray Art by ReLman Lab at stanford Relman Lab microarray art

 

My favourite was DNA ArT offering dnaCode, your personal code will be lasered into a solid, high quality, clear crystal block and the DNA aRT your DNa as a painting in  9 colors

 

DNa code

 

 

 

 

 

 

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