NVidia to launch a touch screen Android OS PC powered by 8 core chip that runs for 25 days

NVIDIA and Notion Ink, launches ‘Adam’, a touch screen tablet at the Las Vegas Consumer Electronics Show in January 2010, a high-tech IT product that was completely developed in India, marking the country’s big entry into product development.

With NVIDIA’s Tegra system-on-chip at its heart, Adam is a device the new generation technology user dreams of. Its battery can work for 25 days. It will have only a screen and no physical key board. One can manoeuvre the cursor using the finger commands from the front or at the back. It will have a camera that can rotate to take pictures and videos, or for video chat. It can talk to other smart devices, including phones.

Tech Spec

OS                            Google Android
General                 2G , 3G Network Triband UMTS/HSDPA GSM 850/900/1800/1900
3G Network          HSDPA 1700 / 2100 / 900
Status                    Available. January 2010
Size                        Dimensions     6.3 x 9.8 x 0.6 inches , 1.7 pounds
Display                 10.1 inch display capable of displaying 1024 x 600 pixels, Full HD capability Digital Compass, Accelerometer, Proximity,     Ambient light, Water sensors
Memory
Internal                Solid State 16/32 GB storage, can be increased further with SD card
Card slot               microSD,
Data                     GPRS     Class 32
3G                         HSDPA, 10Mbps; HSUPA, 2Mbps
WLAN                   Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g, DLNA
Bluetooth              Yes, v2.1 with A2DP
Connectivity           USB, HDMI,
Sound                   a 3.5mm headphone jack and a microphone input
USB                     Yes, v2.0 microUSB
Camera                  Primary     3MP, 2576×1936 pixels,
CPU                     eight-core NVIDIA’s Tegra T20 system-on-chip
GPS                     Yes, with A-GPS support;
Battery                Standard battery, Li-Ion 1320 mAh (BL-5J)
48hrs standby on its integrated rechargeable Li-Ion battery,
8hrs of HD video playback and 16hrs of internet surfing over WiFi
25 Days on Music play

6.3 by 9.8-inch device works on Google’s Android and Mary Lou’s Pixel Qi that offers a paper display, putting no pressure on the eyes. With 1024X600 wide SVGA colour resolution, the screen contains finger-print-resistant oleophobic coating. With a capacity of up to 32 GB flash drive, it would have SD card support, a digital compass, GPS and Wi-Fi.

It can run for 25 days if one wants to listen to just music. It can run eight hours of high-definition video or 16 hours of Wi-Fi Web use, Rohan Shravan, founder and Director, Creatives, of Notion Ink, claims.

The half-inch thick device is likely to be priced at USD$ 300. The device would be connected to specially-devised servers called Genesis.

How they managed to tackle these challenges one by one could be a good case study for wannabe entrepreneurs.

With angel funding from an IT consultant, the team started looking for people to work on the project. They needed about 50 engineers, both hardware and software.

After discussions with several colleges, they tied up with BVRIT, a technology institute not very far from the Hi-Tec City, the hub of all the IT activity in Andhra Pradesh.

The arrangement was simple. Notion Ink would utilise the lab as its development centre and the students as its workforce, while the students get training in the industry-ready technologies such as Android and cloud.

“We then roped in the National Institute of Design (at the Bangalore Research and Development campus) to discuss the user interface that should go into the next generation tablet,” Shravan explains.

As some of them got down to the task of planning the design, internal architecture of the product, HR aspects and infrastructure, the remaining members of the team went to the US and Taiwan to address the hardware and manufacturing needs. While they joined hands with NVIDIA for Tegra, they teamed up with TPK for touch screens and another Original Device Manufacturer for manufacturing the complete product.

Seeing a good idea, NVIDIA offered to handhold the team. “Theirs is a brilliant idea and we have seen the burning desire in them to create an innovative product. It has got good potential in India in the fields of education, entertainment and telemedicine,” J.A. Chowdhary, Managing Director of NVIDIA India, points out.

After nearly a year’s hard work and consuming all the monies they earned for a year or two before Notion Ink, the team has not run out of steam as yet.

They are now busy testing the device with some telecom companies for cross-check connectivity issues.

“We are going to get the first batch of 60 Adams. We are in talks with content providers and have signed pacts in some segments. These tie-ups will be for content delivery and content aggregation,” Shravan says.

Looks like Notion Ink will be competing with a similar system laucnhed by Converged Devices

Android 2.0 Eclair
186mm x 158mm x 18mm
7″ Touchscreen
NVIDIA Tegra
512 DDR / 512 NAND
1.3 MP Web Cam
4GB Internal SD (non removable)
Micro SD
Bluetooth 2.1
Wireless 802.11 b/g
USB 2.0
2g/3g Data
Cellular
3.5mm Audio Jack
Accelerometer
Ambient light sensor
Dual digital microphones
FM Radio

More news

http://notionink.wordpress.com/

Blogging and complying with FDA and other medical device regulations

Blogging and complying with FDA and other medical device regulations – how to safely generate a corporate blog for a medical device company?

Given that marketing communications for medical device companies are tightly regulated, I wonder how realistic it is for a medical device company to generate a blog. Would love to hear from anyone that has experience or a perspective.

My answers are on Linkedin

http://www.linkedin.com/answers/marketing-sales/search-marketing/MAR_SRC/466277-10937?browseIdx=0&sik=1240994405907&goback=.ama

Online Data sharing for scientists

Brent Edwards director of the Starkey Hearing Research Center in Berkeley, California, who blogs on innovation in science is writing his blog about an article on Nature magazine on online data sharing. Brent comments about the potential of new online data sharing sites such as Swivel and IBM’s Many Eyes . Accoding to the Nature reprt some scientists are already using these new tools to share sequence and microarray data. The potential value from scientists openly sharing their data is huge, possibly akin to the value provided by open-source software development.

Once data are uploaded to these sites (which are still being tested), people can reanalyse the numbers, mix them with other data and visualize them in different ways. Swivel focuses on letting users combine data sets, with some basic ways to present the results such as scatter graphs and bar charts. Many Eyes allows users to generate more complicated graphs such as network diagrams, which depict nodes and connections within networks, and treemaps, which display data as groups of nested rectangles

Despite the availability of many software solutions at the dispoal of scientists many of them still write their own code for bioinformatics and statistical analysis, perhaps the next frontier that might help the comunity could be the development of Firefox like software, that offers some basic functions free of cost, additional function can be bought or acquired free of cost as add ons form researchers, such a move would benefit researchers and students alike,

There are sure many more data sharing website like http://www.gotomyfiles.com, http://www.xdrive.com, http://www.ibackup.com, but these are more of a data storage sites, and these does not offer the level of document collaboration features required by a life science researcher

Then there is few other sites like microsofts foldershare and others that offer features such as remote PC access gotomyPC VNC and webex are a few exmaple of this stable. some of these also allows to by pass even a firewall such as foldershare and can pose serious security risks to data and pc if handled improperly

its not so much of junk DNA- University of Oxford Scientists discoveres Cancer cure with it

 Junk DNA is not junk after all

Recently, scientists at the University of Oxford have discovered that ‘junk’ genetic material can switch off cancer tumours, preventing them from growing.

By using RNA to switch off a gene involved in controlling cell division, Oxford University scientists may have found a role for RNA in developing new cancer therapies. RNA is the mirror image of DNA, and is used to pass on instructions to the cell to build the proteins that run every body function.

The Human Genome Project found that human DNA carries approximately 34,000 genes that produce proteins. The remaining majority of the genome constituted what was considered to be junk DNA as it had no obvious function. However, this is set to change.

‘‘There has been a quiet revolution taking place in biology in past few years,’’ said Dr Alexandre Akoulitchev, a Senior Research Fellow at Oxford. ‘‘Scientists have begun to see ‘junk’ DNA as having an important function. The variety of RNA types produced from this so called ‘junk’ is staggering and the functional implications are huge.”

Akoulitchev studied the RNA that regulates a gene called DHFR. This gene produces an enzyme that controls the production of molecules called tetrahydrofolate and thymine that cells need to divide rapidly.

“Switching off the DHFR gene could help prevent ordinary cells from developing into cancerous tumour cells, by slowing down their replication. In fact, one of the first anti-cancer drugs, Methotrexate, acts by binding and inhibiting the enzyme produced by this gene. Targeting the gene itself would cut the enzyme out of the picture altogether. Understanding how we can use RNA to switch off or inhibit DHFR and other genes may have important therapeutic implications for developing new anti-cancer treatments.”

This research was funded by The Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council.

Original paper: Repression of the human dihydrofolate reductase gene by a non-coding interfering transcript was published in Nature on 22nd January 2006.

Yahoo answers- Interact with the President of India

Thats not really a big surprise considering he himself is a scientist, Dr. Abdul Kalam Azad the President of India who is also the commander in chief of the Army,Navy and Airforce of India, and is key force for India’s nuclear and Space power and technology uses, yahoo answer so that he can listen and hear from his people, so what about our scientist ! especially in life sciencs and academicians. Recently I had posted about the similar attempts by US presidentail hopeful’s sudden rush to web2.0. and how youtube is helping the science

Dr. Kalam’s His thought provoking question,  has garnered over 28000 answers in just 30 days. wow thats a response rate you could never expect in any other online forum asking for soutions to a scientific question or problem

chekout more visit his profile at http://in.answers.yahoo.com/my/profile?show=1e6b7ca835ee0cc4185b0ab950476c08aa
Some leading Indian figures like Sri Sri Ravishankar, Kiran Bedi, and Leander Paes have posted answers to Dr. Kalam’s question

less than 10% of people build content in an online community — in this case answer questions. The popular thumb-rule for online participation is 1% visitors would be hard-core contributors, 10% mild contributors, and 90% would be beneficiaries

By 2006 end, Yahoo! Answers had gained over 60 million unique users on a monthly basis

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070112135510AAD7SB8

From Life comes Art- So what about DNA

everyone is talking about DNA 11 a Canadian company that turns your DNA into high design.It’s as easy as taking a cotton swab sample from the inside of your cheek and selecting a color scheme and print size. In just a few weeks you’ll have a one-of-a-kind DNA portrait from DNA11.com

Store Digital data with live bacteria

A research team said this week it had developed a technology for storing digital data in the DNA of bacteria, which unlike most living organisms can survive for millennia in the right conditions.

Japanese researchers have successfully stored messages in the DNA of bacteria. The hardiness of the hay bacillus bacteria ensures the digital data encoded into them can last for millenia.

Generally found in soil or decaying matter, hay bacillus are exceptionally resistant to extreme weather conditions. Two megabits (data equivalent to 1.6 million Roman letters) can be stored in each bacterium of hay bacillus in the form of implants. These tiny implants can be extracted in a lab and read like ordinary text at a later date.

Each hay bacillus bacterium can store two megabits — the equivalent of 1.6 million Roman letters. The scientists can take out the microscopic implants in a laboratory and read them so they appear as ordinary text.

The team at Keio University’s Institute for Advanced Biosciences said the technology needs to be perfected but that it was optimistic about its future uses.

“If I wanted to store my personal diary in these live bacteria and take it with me to my grave, then my story can live for thousands and thousands of years,” head researcher Yoshiaki Ohashi said with a laugh.

In practical terms, the technology could eventually benefit companies such as pharmaceutical makers which want to “stamp” their brand.

“In doing so, the company can detect piracy and protect its patent. They can also store information at one specific area of the gene and retrieve it from there,” Ohashi said.

The researchers insert the data at four different places so even if one is disrupted, there would be backup.

But the team said they still needed to work before the technology could go on the market. In particular, the scientists need to ensure that the DNA will not be altered as live bacteria naturally evolve.

Hay bacillus bacteria are generally found in soil or decaying matter and are especially resistant to extreme weather.

One of the practical applications of this technology lies in the area of pharmaceuticals. Fraudulent drugs are a major problem but if pharmaceutical companies could “stamp” their signature into the drugs, it would prevent piracy and at the same time protect their patents. To prevent corruption of the message encoding, the data would be inserted into 4 different places as multiple backups.
The bacteria’s hardiness and ability to preserve data for future generations would also be extremely useful in storing vast amounts of data which would not be suspectible to the types of damage that wipe out computer hard drives. Information stored on DNA lasts for more than one hundred million years.

The researchers project being able to develop a type of living memory for a new breed of organic computers which would use strands of DNA to perform calculations and would have the ability to heal themselves if damaged.

Though the promise of this technology is very high, the scientists caution more work is needed before it can be marketed. One of the hurdles to overcome is ensuring very slow mutation rates in the DNA as the bacteria evolve, otherwise the messages encoded will be rendered unreadable.

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